Housekeeping Camp

Housekeeping Camp

Merced River outside Housekeeping camp, Yosemite National Park.

For the first time ever, I ended up staying at the housekeeping camp in Yosemite National Park. I have previously stayed at the tent city in Curry village – and this was a treat. The housekeeping cabin consisted of three concrete walls, concrete roof, one canvas entrance, beds, and a patio with a fire ring. It was also right next to the Merced river. It was so cold in the night that the two space
heaters we got were life savers.

I was walking to the Merced to set up for a night shot – to try to stack for star trails (Click here to see what I got). I happened to look back and this is what I saw …Moon light and camplight almost merging all separated by these tall tall trees.

Technical Details:

Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera
Exposure: 10s at f/4.0
Focal Length: 10mm
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f3.5-4.5
ISO: 3200
WB: Daylight
Date: October 8, 2011

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Star Trail on Merced

Star Trail on Merced

Merced River outside Housekeeping camp, Yosemite National Park.

For the first time ever, I ended up staying at the housekeeping camp in Yosemite National Park. I have previously stayed at the tent city in Curry village – this was a treat. The housekeeping cabin consisted of three concrete walls, concrete roof, one canvas entrance, beds, and a patio with a fire ring. It was also right next to the Merced river. It was so cold in the night that the two space
heaters we got were life savers.

At night, I went and setup my camera and tripod with an intervelometer menaing to let it run through the night while I sleep happily. However, within about an hour, there was mist and then fog – I bailed out on this plan at this point. This photograph is a stack of the images in about a 50 min span.

Below are some links to tutorials about Star Trails for those interested:
Star Circle Academy star trails – http://blog.starcircleacademy.com/2011/03/star-trail-creation/
Photo extremist – some tricks – http://photoextremist.com/star-trails-tutorial
Another nice tutorial – http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/725769/0

Technical Details:

Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera
Exposure: Stack of 120s, f4.0 exposures
Focal Length: 12mm
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f3.5-4.5
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 8, 2011

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Lightning from Barcroft Station

Lightning from Barcroft Station

Sunset on White Mountain, View from above Barcroft Station, California

In August (2011), I attended a workshop – \”Dark of the Night Star Photography\”. This was organized by the Pt. Reyes National Seashore Association and the instructors were the really good Harold Davis, Steven Christenson and Eric Harness. (Side Note: Check this interview I did with Harold Davis a while back – its an awesome read.)

On Day 2 of the workshop, we drove up to the Barcroft Research Station at 12500ft, and got a tour of the facility. After that we hiked up about 3/4th of a mile to a view point to see sunset on white mountain. I made it up there with difficult due to a bad case of altitude sickness.

We saw a spectacular sunset up there, and headed back down. As we were heading down back to our vehicles, thunder storms were playing in the sky opposite to us. This is the first photograph of lightning I have ever made.
Technical Details:

Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera
Exposure: 1s at f/4.5
Focal Length: 20mm
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5
ISO: 1250
WB: Daylight
Date: August 27, 2011

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Sea Swings

Sea Swings
Sea Swings, by Suprada on Flickr.

Sea Swings, Ride at Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk.

This evening I went on a shoot with the Bay Area Night Photography meetup group. A nice bunch of people to hangout with. The location was the Santa Cruz beach boardwalk in Santa Cruz, CA. We met up in front of the boardwalk arcade around 5.15PM, in the group picnic area and headed into the boardwalk. Sunset was supposed to be around 6.30PM and the rides close for the night at 7.00PM. So we had a little bit of time wandering around – and it was not quite dark yet. I went and shot the carousel, then the Fireball and then to the Sea-Swings – this shot. By this time it was around sunset. Since it was bright, I was using my 10 stop ND filter for the long exposures – which, in this shot very nicely brought out the sunset colors. It was a very nice sunset and a part of me was wishing I were on a different becah shting teh sunset – but it totally made this shot – my first ever of a amusement park ride.

After I shot this, I wanted to move on and shoot the Ferris wheel. I actually setup there – that when the security guards, very politely told me that I was welcome to take photos – but without teh tripod. Alas! At that point I decided to head out to the next venue – the Surfer\’s Museum near the lighthouse to photograph some fire dancers.

Technical Details:

Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera
Exposure: 30s at at f/4.0
Focal Length: 17mm
Lens:Canon 10-22mm EF-S f3.5-4.5
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 1000
WB: Daylight
Date: October 23, 2011

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SoFoBoMo 2011

These days I am very excited about participating in SoFoBoMo 2011 – \”The worst photo competition in the world\”. For those of you who don\’t know about SoFoBoMo – it stands for Solo Photo Book Month. What are the rules?

Make a photography ebook/PDF with a minimum of 35 photos . From the shooting to layout to finishing and posting -it needs to be completed within 31 days. Participants can begin any time between July 1 and aug #1 – but once they start they have 31 days.

Sounds nuts? Sounds challenging? Sounds easy? You should try it. It\’s not too late to give it a go. You can go here to register until July 30 2011.

So why am I taking part in this? After being in a photo-coma for the first half of this year, this is an awesome way to regain my photo-conscious. I need the discipline of dedicated photography, the challenge of trying to photograph with a theme / idea in mind and ending up with a related body of photos – a project! I like the challenge of creating a book – of grappling with layout, format – of learning about editing and designing and typography. Most of all, it is very nicely self contained – there is a beginning and an end. If I don\’t make a book in 31 days – the time-period is over – and my tendency to carry on forever can\’t play here.

My SoFoBoMo month started last Saturday – July 7 – when I started taking some photos. I signed up for SoFoBoMo 2011 back in May. Since then, I have been doing some research / prep work. I have been reading the resources section of the SoFoBoMo website, tips from other participants. I have also been looking into which desktop publishing software to use, studying book design, basic typography, layout , editing etc – what fun! All the while eagerly waiting for July to begin.

Meanwhile, I found a blog post by Niels Henrikson where he suggests the following schedule:
Week 1 – Image Collection
Week 2 – Processing
Week 3 Editing and Arranging
Week 4 – Publishing ebook and Done.

Which is what I planned to do exactly – but now, there is a modification:

Week 1 – Shooting, first round of selection
Week 2 – Editing photos, printing draft copies of photos which make the cut, getting bthe ook template ready, if time allows, some more shooting
Week 3 -Selecting the pre-final cut, draft copy of book with images, reshooting if necessary
Week 4 – Last week for polishing the book.

Before I started on my SoFoBoMo month, I decided on what I would shoot this time around as a part of my preparation (allowed by the rules). I decided on the working title of my book \”Confluences\”, the tag line being \”when day meets night, when water meets land\”. My idea was to shoot the spectacular beaches of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties at twilight – either around sunset or sunrise. I wanted to use the digital Holga lens from Holgsmods.com and a Peleng 8mm fisheye lens for this. And use Scribus – a free desktop publishing software (alternative to Adobe InDesign) to create the book. And accompany photos with text and maybe some poetry. The photograph below inspired me to choose my theme for this project. More on what\’s happening since July 7 on my next post.

Blue Hour
Blue Hour, by Suprada on Flickr.

Blue Hour, 4 Mile Beach, Wilder Ranch, Santa Cruz County.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D
Exposure: 2.5s at f/4.5Focal Length: 11mm
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm
ISO: 400
WB: Daylight
Date: March 04, 2011

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 6

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 6
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 6, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall.

By the time this photograph was made, the shadow of the canyon was on the upper end of the waterfall. This caused the white patch of rock to glow and the water to turn bluish. In my post-processing, I used Tony Kuyper\’s photoshop action called \”Make it Glow\” to get the glow in the photograph like how it looked that afternoon.

Other photos from this series:
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 5

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 0.5s at at f/22
Focal Length: 18mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 5

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 5

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument. This photograph is pretty much the classic view of the waterfalls. You can see the shadows starting to creep up on the left.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 2s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 22mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 4
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument. This photograph shows the waterfalls in its canyon environment.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 2s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 10mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 0.8s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 18mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure:5s at at f/8.0
Focal Length: 16mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Molars at Devils Garden

Molars at Devils Garden
Molars at Devils Garden, by Suprada on Flickr.

Rock formation at the Devil\’s Garden in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010. On the morning of Oct 19, we got out of Fosters Motel outside Bryce Canyon National Park. We headed out for a sunrise shoot at Kodachrome Basin State park.

At Kodachrome Basin, we hiked the Angel\’s Palace Trail getting on top before sunrise. In the newsletter we got at the entrance station, this trail is described as follows: \”Rising 150 feet (46m) above the basin floor, this 1.5 mile trail affords magnificent vies of Kodachrome Basin, Bryce Canyon and the surrounding area. It is an excellent trail for photographers. Difficulty: Easy / Moderate.”

It was a really enjoyable hike. However I have no photos I like from this expedition. I think of it as a scouting trip. Next time I\’ll be heading to Kodachrome for sunset.

We headed out to the town of Escalante for breakfast, restocking supplies and to visit the excellent visitor center of the Grand Staircase – Escalante National Monument. After gassing up, we headed out to Devils Garden – about 16 miles away. Unfortunately driving a rental sedan on the wash-boardy Hole-in-the-Rock road was very nerve-wracking. Next time I\’ll certainly drive at least a high clearance vehicle.

Devil\’s garden is pretty fantastic. Too bad we reached there around midday. It will be spectacular at sunrise and sunset. However, since I was there, i made this photograph – with the intention of making it Black and White during post-processing. I call these formations \”The Molars” since they remind me of – well – Molars.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure:1/50s at at f 6.3
Focal Length: 10mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 19, 2010

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Painted Buildings

Painted Buildings
Painted Buildings, Paseo de Montejo, Mexico, by Suprada on Flickr.

Our last day in Merida, I was walking along the Paseo de Montejo. I decided to eat some honey-dew flavored ice cream (which by the way was awesome) at a local ice cream parlor on the street. The street was lined with stores on the pavement selling different kinds of art – paintings, pottery, sketches, sculptures, photographs. Enjoying an ice cream looking at a city go about its leisurely business was very pleasant.

Walking back to the hotel, I saw these buildings which looked like they were starting to go under renovation. The way the buildings looked in the mid-day sun reminded me of the painting: pastel colors and beautiful rough textures.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon G9
Exposure: 0.02sec at f/3.2
Focal Length: 14.8mm
ISO: 80
WB: Daylight
Date: December 27, 2009

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Hotel Rooms

Hotel Rooms
Hotel Rooms, by Suprada on Flickr.

This is a photograph of the hotel rooms, looking up from the gorgeous pool at the Presidente Intercontinental hotel in Merida. This very nice hotel is located very close to the Paseo De Montejo and a slightly long walk from Centro.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 20s at f6.7
Focal Length: 10mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009

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Pool at Presidente Intercontinental, Mérida

Pool at Presidente Intercontinental, Mérida
Pool at Presidente Intercontinental, Mérida, by Suprada on Flickr.

This is a photograph of the gorgeous pool at the Presidente Intercontinental hotel in Merida when we were there in December. Located very close to the Paseo De Montejo and close to Centro, this hotel was quite nice.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 15s at f6.7
Focal Length: 10mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009

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Paseo de Montejo, Mérida,

Paseo de Montejo, Mérida
Paseo de Montejo, Mérida, by Suprada on Flickr.
Paseo de Montejo, Mérida, Mexico

We stayed at the Presidente Intercontinental hotel in Merida when we were there in December. One night, we decided to walk to the nearest Italian place for dinner. We walked down and along the Pases De Montejo. The street was lit up with Christmas lights. Looking at this scene, I just absolutely had to try to make a photograph.

This photograph was made at the \”Monumento a la Patria\” looking out to the street.

More about the Paseo de Montejo from http://www.differentworld.com/mexico/areas/yucatan-and-campeche/merida/guide.htm: \”This major boulevard is Merida\’s answer to the Champs Elysées in Paris. Magnificent mansions, built at the height of the henequen industry, line the broad streets – many are now banks or offices. Remember that good road and rail links to Mexico City were not fully completed until the 1960s and you\’ll understand why trade with Europe influenced architectural styles and fashions so much here. One of the most beautiful mansions (the Palacio Canton) houses the Museum of Anthropology. Its contents are well worth a look, though not as comprehensive as the one in Mexico City.\”

Post – Processing Notes:
This photograph is a blend of two exposures. With my camera on a tripod, I shot one frame for the center lights – and underexposed

the rest of the image. I then shot another frame exposing for the car trails. I hand-blended them in Photoshop.

For more information about hand-blending (or multi-raw processing as Harold davis calls it), check out Harold Davis\’ Multi-Raw Processing tutorial on photo.net

You can go to my My Night Photography techniques post to read about other techniques I use. You can also download this article for your reference. Download Stacking Cheatsheet.pdf

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: blend of two exposures
Focal Length: 19mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009

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