Gothic Church, Eknakan

Gothic Church, Eknakan
Gothic Church, Eknakan, by Suprada on Flickr.
Gothic Church, Eknakan, Mexico

This beautiful church pops out of nowhere in Eknakan. It was dark by the time I shot this photograph. I am so enamoured by this church that I wanted to know more about it. Here is what I got after trawling the web for information:
From yucatan.gob.mx/estado/turismo/haciendas/eknakan/eknakan.htm:
\”It is on the road Acanceh – Cuzamá only 16 kilometers from the first.

Eknakán means \”the dark house of the snake” or \”four dark houses.” It was an important hacienda built with the intention that one day outside the village church and not only of the estate.

The church is of Gothic architecture, according to connoisseurs, classical Germany. It is considered a museum. It has many windows, some circular, where you can admire the colorful stained glass remains that allowed a surprising light.

The choir of the temple is a masonry balcony with white columns in protocols that are part of the majesty of the building.

The carved wooden altar, with ornament same as the interior columns of the temple, there are steps of granite. On one side, in a chapel, a table looks carved an image of San Francisco with hands, feet and side with the marks of crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

These images are brightly colored colonial rough and sometimes overly prominent features at the foot of San Francisco is a wooden horse is not known who could have been.

An oil painting perhaps five feet two representing the Virgen del Rosario and whose signature is hidden by a wooden frame carved with relief.

Other things that make up the so-called museum are ancient copper bells, a bowl of fine china ornate serves as a baptismal font, a closet where clothes are protected priests no longer in use and three wooden chests.\”

Too bad I did not have any time to go inside the church. A must-visit for anybody travelling in that region. There is a courtyard outside the church where a car can be parked and a picnic lunch – or in the case of photographers, a picnic dinner can be eaten.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the temperature, clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

What do you think?

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 6s at f/3.5
Focal Length: 11mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Church Windows

Church Windows
Church Windows, by Suprada on Flickr.
Church Windows, Eknakan, Mexico

These are the windows of a beautiful old Gothic Church in the middle of nowhere in the Yucatan peninsula … at Eknakan. We happened to pass by the church on our way to the \’Los Tres Cenotes\’ and stopped here to photograph the church around dusk. The stained glass windows of the church were glowing with light from inside as darkness was rapidly falling outside. Just beautiful!

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 4s at f/4.5
Focal Length: 19mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Cycle and Stonework

Cycle and Stonework
Cycle and Stonework, by Suprada on Flickr.
Cycle and Stonework, Eknakan, Mexico

We wanted to visit the \”Los Tres Cenotes\’ in the Yucatan peninsula. A tourist information person in Merida told us that these three cenotes were a couple of hours away. We asked him to mark the route on a map and set out. We got lost once, and found ourselves on the right road again. As the roads became narrower and the scenery became rural, our doubts kept increasing – are we on the right road? We passed through a couple of villages and finally stopped to ask a person for directions – only, he didn\’t know any English and our Spanish was extremely meager. But sign language and body language rule! We got our directions and we headed to the cenotes.

Only to find that it was crazily packed – a horse cart to take us to the cenotes meant at least a couple of hours of waiting. So we set out walking – an impromptu hike indeed. We reached the first cenote, where a boy sitting outside wanted to charge us money for entering the cenote – charge us and noone else. Well, that didn\’t happen. We had a great time at the cenote. It was packed when we got there, but soon everybody left and we had the place to oursleves. After having a good time, we walked back to the car and started driving out.

On the way in, I had noticed this amazing looking – almost dilapidated awesome church. I convinced the other 4 people that it was a great idea to stop for a few minutes at the church so I can take a few photos….well anybody with a photographer knows how long \”a few minutes\’ really are. This village was Eknakan.

Since it was late in the day, around sunset, the light was fading fast. I had to setup my trusty tripod. Almost immediately, my attention was caught by this \”brand new” looking shiny blue bicycle leaning against the gorgeous old walls. This is the subject of this photograph.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I played around with the clarity, vibrance, exposure and curves settings for this photograph.

Link to posts from Uxmal
Link to oher posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 4s at f/4.5
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 26, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Magician\’s Pyramid – another view

Magician\
Magician\’s Pyramid – another view, by Suprada on Flickr.
Magician\’s Pyramid – another view, Uxmal, Mexico

Another view of the Magician\’s pyramid in Uxmal. Excerpt from www.luxuriousmexico.com website: \”Sometimes called the “Temple of the Dwarf,” or “La Casa del Enano” (House of the Dwarf,) this structure is one of the key structures in Uxmal due to its size and religious significance. This is the most impressive structure and the tallest standing at 117 feet (38 m) high; this structure dominates your view as you enter the complex. Unusually built on an elliptical base, this pyramid is the result of five superimposed temples. Parts of the first temple can be seen when ascending the western staircase; the second and third are accessed by the eastern staircase, in an inner chamber at the second level. The fourth temple is clearly visible from the west side, a giant Chaac mask marks the entrance and Chaac’s mouth is the door. Note also the series of Chaac masks on the sides of the stairway. Climb to the top of the east stairs to reach the fifth temple and view the whole site.

Located on the eastern side of the city, with its western face overlooking The Nunnery Quadrangle, this is the first structure seen as visitors enter the city. Though it appears as a single structure, this pyramid has in fact been built and added to five times in the course of history, in the known Maya practice of building newer temples on top of older ones at 52 year cycles. At the base of the western stairs archeologists have discovered the original temple that started the complete construction (called “Temple One”) and its birth has been carbon dated to the year 569. Though the overall temple as it appears now was completed between 900 – 1000 AD.

Structure like “El Castillo” at Chichén-Itzá are known for their angled, stepped appearance, but The Pyramid of the Dwarf is different from any other structure built by the Maya in that it resembles a truncated cone, with an oval base and no corners other than those found on the stairs and on the temples found at the apex of those stairs.

The Eastern Stairs are the widest of the two sets, starting from the base of the structure to the upper temple. The roof of the temple at the top of the eastern stairs stands 45 meters from the ground. Near the top of the eastern stairs is a smaller inner temple that cuts into the stairway itself. Once used for ceremonial purposes, this dark two-room temple is now a home for bats.

The Western Stairs overlook The Nunnery Quadrangle, and perhaps by virtue of them facing this significant structure, are very richly decorated and carved compared to the eastern side. Along both sides of this narrower staircase, images of the hooked-nose rain god Chaac line the stairs meaning that as worshipers climbed the stairs to the upper temples they would be in effect climbing a \”Stairways of the Gods” towards the place where they would perform their ceremonies. The Upper Temple of the western stairs is in the Chenes style, where the open doorway to the inner temple is meant to resemble the jaws of a huge Cosmic Serpent in the visage of the Mayan god of the sky, Itzamna.\”

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them, I used two Lightroom develop presets available for free on the internet.

I first used the \”Wet Chrome” preset by Terry Johnston I found on Flickr. Search for \”Wet Chrome” in this page to download the preset.
I then followed it by using \”BW1″ from the set of BW presets from 640 pixels to convert to Black and White. Yes, this set of very high contrast and very good black and white conversions is free! I then tweaked the image using the adjustment brush and the other lightroom controls to get the image to my liking.
What do you think about the image and the post-processing?

Link to other posts from Uxmal
Link to other posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1/250 at f/4.0
Focal Length: 19mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 25, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Nunnery Quadrangle

Nunnery Quadrangle
Nunnery Quadrangle, by Suprada on Flickr.
Nunnery Quadrangle, Uxmal, Mexico.

During my trip to Mexico during Christmas of 2009, we visited the Mayan ruins of Uxmal in the Yucatan peninsula. From Locogringo.com \”The name Uxmal means \’thrice-built\’ in Mayan, referring to the construction of its highest structure, the Pyramid of the Magician. The Maya would often build a new temple over an existing one, and in this case five stages of construction have actually been found. Uxmal was one of the largest cities of the Yucatán peninsula, and at its height was home to about 25,000 Maya. Like the other Puuc sites, it flourished in the Late Classic period (around 600-900 AD). Indications are that its rulers also presided over the nearby settlements in Kabah, Labná and Sayil, and there are several sacbe\’s (white roads of the Maya) connecting the sites. The area is known as the Ruta Puuc, or Puuc route, from the nearby hills. With a population of about 25,000 Uxmal was one of the largest cities in the Yucatán.\”

This photograph here shows the highly carved western facade on the Nunnery Quadrangle, with the pattern echoing the serpentine pattern of the snake and decorated with the rain god Yuun Chaac\’s masks. From the Sacred Destinations website: \”The Nunnery Quadrangle was given its name by the 16th-century Spanish historian Fray Diego López de Cogullado because it reminded him of a Spanish convent. It may have been a military academy or a training school for Mayan princes, who would have lived in the 74 rooms. The rooms have no interior decoration and have mostly been taken over by swallows.
The buildings of the Nunnery Quadrangle were constructed at different times: first the northern; then the southern, eastern, and western buildings. The western building has the most richly decorated facade, featuring intertwined stone snakes and numerous masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac. Above each
doorway in the the archway to the south of the Nunnery

Quadrangle features the motif of a Maya cottage, or nah, which is still seen throughout the Yucatán today.\”

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them, I used two Lightroom develop presets available for free on the internet.

I first used the \”Wet Chrome” preset by Terry Johnston I found on Flickr. Search for \”Wet Chrome” in this page to download the preset.
I then followed it by using \”BW1″ from the set of BW presets from 640 pixels to convert to Black and White. Yes, this set of very high contrast and very good black and white conversions is free! I then tweaked the image using the adjustment brush and the other lightroom controls to get the image to my liking.
What do you think about the image and the post-processing?

Link to other posts from Uxmal
Link to other posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1/180 at f/4.5
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 25, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)
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Yuan Chaac\’s Nose

Yuan Chaac\
Yuan Chaac\’s Nose, by Suprada on Flickr.

Yuan Chaac\’s Nose, Uxmal, Mexico.

Yuan Chaac (pronounced yuuuun chaaaaac) is the ancient Maya god of rain and lightning. He was one of the earliest and most worshipped gods among the all the people of mesoamerica. Chac was often depicted with a serpentine axe in his hand a metaphor for lightning, and his body was scaled and reptilian. He was worshipped at sacred wells or cenotes, and was associated with the life giving rain needed for agriculture. At the dawn of time Chac split apart a sacred stone with his axe, from which sprung the first ear of maize. When he was not among the clouds the god could be found near falling waters.

Uxmal doesn\’t have very many cenotes (the underground fresh water pools). The Maya here depended on the rains. Not surprisingly, they built Uxmal trying to draw the benevolent eye of their rain god. Chaac is always invoked with the long hooked nose, shown in the photo above. He was a reptilian god, and the architecture in Uxmal echoes, celebrates and worships snakes.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them, I used two Lightroom develop presets available for free on the internet.

I first used the \”Wet Chrome” preset by Terry Johnston I found on Flickr. Search for \”Wet Chrome” in this page to download the preset.
I then followed it by using \”BW1″ from the set of BW presets from 640 pixels to convert to Black and White. Yes, this set of very high contrast and very good black and white conversions is free! I then tweaked the image using the adjustment brush and the other lightroom controls to get the image to my liking.
What do you think about the image and the post-processing?

Link to other posts from Uxmal
Link to other posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1/180 at f/4.0
Focal Length: 15mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 25, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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The Magician\’s Pyramid

The Magician\
The Magician\’s Pyramid, by Suprada on Flickr.

The Magician\’s Pyramid, Uxmal, Mexico

When we visited Mexico last December, I specifically wanted to visit some of the ancient Maya sites. Doing my research for the trip, I came across multiple reviews recommending Uxmal. Uxmal is supposed to be the most elegant of the Inca archeological sites with very elegant carvings. It is also supposed to be a lot less crowded -fewer visitors – nothing like the insanity of Chichen Itza.

I must report that all the above is true. When we landed in Cancun, we drove directly to Merida. On Christmas Day, we headed out to Uxmal – hoping for even fewer crowds. We were not disappointed. It was a great day – the billowy dark rain clouds were moving around the sky – a photographers dream. At Uxmal, we hired a guide to take us around and explain the excavated ruins. That was a very good move – it brought the ruins to life and we got to know about the Mayans in a very entertaining way. Highly recommended if you want the place to appear more than a bunch of buildings and experience the site. We also got to know that a very small part of Uxmal has been excavated and a lot of archaeological work is ongoing. Here\’s more about Uxmal on the internet – http://www.locogringo.com/past_spotlights/nov2001.html

The photo here shows the Pyramid of the magician, taken with a very wide angle lens. Note the horizon line band in the center of the frame…no rule of thirds for me here! Here is an entertaining < href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_of_the_Magician\">story about how the Pyramid of the magician came about from Wikipedia – \”nother tale holds that when a certain gong was to sound, the city of Uxmal was destined to fall to a boy “not born of woman”. The gong was struck, one day, by a dwarf that was born unto no mother, but rather hatched from an egg by a childless, old woman. The sound of the gong struck fear into the city’s ruler and the dwarf was ordered to be executed. The ruler reconsidered the death sentence, though, and promised that the dwarf’s life would be spared if he could perform three seemingly impossible tasks.One of the tasks was to build a massive pyramid, taller than any building

in the city, in a single night. The dwarf ultimately completed all the tasks, including the construction of the pyramid. The dwarf was hailed as the new ruler of Uxmal and the structure was dedicated to him\”

Before I go on to talk about my processing, I must say that I have been influenced Mitch Dobrowner\’s excellent Black and White photographs.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them, I used one develop preset available for free on the internet.

The preset I used was \”BW1″ from the set of BW presets from 640 pixels to convert to Black and White. Yes, this set of very high contrast and very good black and white conversions is free! I then tweaked the image using the adjustment brush and the basic exposures to get the image to my liking.
What do you think about the image and the post-processing?

Link to other posts from Uxmal
Link to other posts from Mexico

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1/750 at f/4.0
Focal Length: 10mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: December 25, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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Surf Motion – 6

Surf Motion - 6
Surf Motion – 6, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 6, Panther beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1.5s at f/16
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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Surf Motion – 5

Surf Motion - 5
Surf Motion – 5, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 5, Panther beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 0.7s at f11.0
Focal Length: 15mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Motion – 4

Surf Motion - 4
Surf Motion – 4, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 4, Hole in the Wall beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 4s at f4.0
Focal Length: 15mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Motion – 3

Surf Motion - 3
Surf Motion – 3, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 3, Hole in the Wall beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1s at f4.5
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Story – 2 (In and Out)

Surf Story - 1-1

Surf Story - 1-2

Surf Story – 2 (In and Out), Hole in the Wall beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: SinghRay Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Motion – 2

Surf Motion - 2
Surf Motion – 2, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 2, Hole in the Wall beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 0.3s at f4.5
Focal Length: 10mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Story – 1

Surf Story - 1-1

Surf Story - 1-2

Surf Story - 1-3

Surf Motion – 1, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Story – 1, Hole in the Wall beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: SinghRay Neutral LB Polarizer

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
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