Photographing – SoFoBoMo 2011

As I am writing this, I am now in my second week of SoFoBoMo 2011. For the first week, my game plan called for the collection of images. And collect images I did.

My first day of SoFoBoMo I went to Scott\’s Creek State beach – north of Santa Cruz. It is on Highway 1 between mileposts 31.8 and 31.9. This beach is very popular with surfers, and has free parking on either side of the highway. GPS Co-Ordinates: 37.0418°N 122.227°W

I pulled in about 7.30PM – sunset was supposed be at 8.30PM. It is very disconcerting, and exhilarating d to pull in and park when everyone else is leaving the beach. It\’s almost like the sunset is just for you.

So, I pull in and park on the side of the road. For the first time I take a look at what the signs say: Parking allowed from 8.00AM to sunset only. So what is a photographer who wants to photograph after sunset do? I decided to park a little away where there was no board. And try to shoot while keeping an eye out on my car. Luckily this beach allows a view of the parked car from all over.

Since sunset was 8.30PM, I had a bit of time to wander around. I was pretty uninspired until I went to the far north of the beach where Scott\’s creek was joining the ocean. I took a deep breath, got out of my hiking shoes and crossed the creek – cold cold water. ON the other side of this creek, there were some rocky shelves, undisturbed sand and a whole lot of inspiration. Suffice to say, my first day of shooting was very successful indeed.

After that, during the week, I got out of work and drove to San Gregorio Beach – just south of Half Moon Bay. This excursion was the least productive – I arrived there at 8.15 – just before sunset. And I didn\’t make any photos I liked from this excursion. Next stop, again on a weekday night was the awesome Pescadero State Beach. This beach was so awesome, that I had to go back and shoot there again the next Sunday (officially Week 2 of SoFoBoMo).

So how did I do overall on Week 1? Pretty good. I got 23 decent images from one week of shooting – three visits to the beaches. The good ones were picked and processed as well. Including this Sunday\’s excursion, I now have 35 photos selected for the book. They have all been processed and kind of sequenced.

Some aspects of teh project changed during this week. I had originally wanted to shoot using the digital Holga and Peleng lens – instead I am using my trusty trio of the 50mm f1.8, the 17-40mm L and the 10-22mm EF-S lenses. One other change – I had initially thought of shooting those beaches where a creek flows into the ocean at sunset or sunrise. Now I just shoot in beaches around sunset. This is what other SoFoBoMo-ers mentioned – be open to the nature of the project changing. I also seem to be shooting mostly at sunset. So the \”sunrise” might disappear from the options soon.

The challenges I faced this week\”
1. Shooting along at twilight and being spooked by my overactive imagination (crazy guy with a machete chasing me…)
2. Parking outside these beaches when no other cars are parked and being a little worried about my car being broken into (so good so far)
3. Watching out for park officials who want to chase me out of the beaches (so far none!)

What next? Though I have 35 photos, I know that some of them can be better. So I plan to go out and shoot one more time – this time to maybe Four Mile Beach or Davenport beach or Waddell beach… Also it is time to dig into desktop publishing software and the challenges of PDF creation. More about that in my next post.

I will leave you with a photo I am most pleased with from my excursion to Scott\’s Creek beach. It might even be the cover image of the book! What do I like about it? Everything. The reflections, the light and shadow, the palette, the awesome opportunity to actually spot the fancy light work while I was shooting… everything!

Scott\
Scott\’s Creek, by Suprada on Flickr.

Scott\’s Creek Beach, North of Davenport, Highway 1

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D
Exposure: 1/8s at f/13
Focal Length: 11mm
Lens: Canon 50mm
ISO: 100
WB: Auto
Date: July 07, 2011

Other SoFoBoMo posts:
Post1: http://www.suprada.com/photoblog/archives/1712

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SoFoBoMo 2011

These days I am very excited about participating in SoFoBoMo 2011 – \”The worst photo competition in the world\”. For those of you who don\’t know about SoFoBoMo – it stands for Solo Photo Book Month. What are the rules?

Make a photography ebook/PDF with a minimum of 35 photos . From the shooting to layout to finishing and posting -it needs to be completed within 31 days. Participants can begin any time between July 1 and aug #1 – but once they start they have 31 days.

Sounds nuts? Sounds challenging? Sounds easy? You should try it. It\’s not too late to give it a go. You can go here to register until July 30 2011.

So why am I taking part in this? After being in a photo-coma for the first half of this year, this is an awesome way to regain my photo-conscious. I need the discipline of dedicated photography, the challenge of trying to photograph with a theme / idea in mind and ending up with a related body of photos – a project! I like the challenge of creating a book – of grappling with layout, format – of learning about editing and designing and typography. Most of all, it is very nicely self contained – there is a beginning and an end. If I don\’t make a book in 31 days – the time-period is over – and my tendency to carry on forever can\’t play here.

My SoFoBoMo month started last Saturday – July 7 – when I started taking some photos. I signed up for SoFoBoMo 2011 back in May. Since then, I have been doing some research / prep work. I have been reading the resources section of the SoFoBoMo website, tips from other participants. I have also been looking into which desktop publishing software to use, studying book design, basic typography, layout , editing etc – what fun! All the while eagerly waiting for July to begin.

Meanwhile, I found a blog post by Niels Henrikson where he suggests the following schedule:
Week 1 – Image Collection
Week 2 – Processing
Week 3 Editing and Arranging
Week 4 – Publishing ebook and Done.

Which is what I planned to do exactly – but now, there is a modification:

Week 1 – Shooting, first round of selection
Week 2 – Editing photos, printing draft copies of photos which make the cut, getting bthe ook template ready, if time allows, some more shooting
Week 3 -Selecting the pre-final cut, draft copy of book with images, reshooting if necessary
Week 4 – Last week for polishing the book.

Before I started on my SoFoBoMo month, I decided on what I would shoot this time around as a part of my preparation (allowed by the rules). I decided on the working title of my book \”Confluences\”, the tag line being \”when day meets night, when water meets land\”. My idea was to shoot the spectacular beaches of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties at twilight – either around sunset or sunrise. I wanted to use the digital Holga lens from Holgsmods.com and a Peleng 8mm fisheye lens for this. And use Scribus – a free desktop publishing software (alternative to Adobe InDesign) to create the book. And accompany photos with text and maybe some poetry. The photograph below inspired me to choose my theme for this project. More on what\’s happening since July 7 on my next post.

Blue Hour
Blue Hour, by Suprada on Flickr.

Blue Hour, 4 Mile Beach, Wilder Ranch, Santa Cruz County.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D
Exposure: 2.5s at f/4.5Focal Length: 11mm
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm
ISO: 400
WB: Daylight
Date: March 04, 2011

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 6

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 6
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 6, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall.

By the time this photograph was made, the shadow of the canyon was on the upper end of the waterfall. This caused the white patch of rock to glow and the water to turn bluish. In my post-processing, I used Tony Kuyper\’s photoshop action called \”Make it Glow\” to get the glow in the photograph like how it looked that afternoon.

Other photos from this series:
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 5

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 0.5s at at f/22
Focal Length: 18mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 5

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 5

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument. This photograph is pretty much the classic view of the waterfalls. You can see the shadows starting to creep up on the left.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 2s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 22mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 4
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 4, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument. This photograph shows the waterfalls in its canyon environment.

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 2s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 10mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 3
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 3, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 0.8s at at f/5.6
Focal Length: 18mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 2
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 2, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Other photos from this series:

Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure:5s at at f/8.0
Focal Length: 16mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1

Lower Calf Creek Falls - 1
Lower Calf Creek Falls – 1, by Suprada on Flickr.

Lower Calf Creek Falls in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument

This photograph was taken during the \”Utah\’s Golden Circle” workshop/field seminar with Rick Knepp during October 2010.
October 20 was the big day – our big hike of the trip – and that too, we were hiking to the Lower Calf Creek Falls. The photographs I have seen from other photographers of this waterfall had me very eager to try my camera out on these falls.

It was 3 mile hike – but since we started a bit late, I was eager to just get to the falls. I made it to the falls just in time – the sunlight was full on the falls – however the shadows were creeping in from the left – it was past midday. The sun was full on the falls, making it difficult to get the silky smooth water flow. This was the perfect opportunity for me to try my ND filter – and I loved the filter. I put on my Neoprene socks and into the water I went with my 10mm wide angle with the ND filter and remote release.

I had a lot of fun photographing here. The neoprene socks and the ND Grad filter were absolutely essential – not to mention my tripod. I am very pleased with the photographs I made of this waterfall. Over the next few blog posts, I will be posting the photographs from the Lower Calf Creek Falls series.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure:5s at at f/8.0
Focal Length: 13mm
Lens:Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Filter: B+W #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: October 20, 2010

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Uvas Canyon Waterfall – 2

Uvas Canyon Waterfall - 2
Uvas Canyon Waterfall – 2, by Suprada on Flickr.

Note: This photograph makes a gorgeous print for your wall. You can buy your copy of this photograph from the Naked Frame: http://www.thenakedframe.com/collections/suprada-urval

Other Uvas Canyon waterfall photos:
Uvas Canyon Waterfall-1

In spring, I went to Uvas Canyon County Park to photograph the waterfalls. Uvas Canyon County Park is near Morgan hill, located at the end of Croy Road in Uvas Canyon. From the Santa Clara County Parks website about Uvas canyon: “This lushly wooded park of 1,133 acres, is nestled in upper Uvas Canyon on the eastern side of the Santa Cruz Mountains. This mountain park offers hiking, camping and picnicking opportunities throughout most of the year.” After an hour’s drive, through very pretty Morgan hill surrounding I reached Uvas Canyon and started out on the “Waterfall loop” trail. The best description I found of the Waterfall loop is from Weekendsherpa – “The Waterfall Loop Trail is a short, sweet stroll that takes hikers past three signature attractions: Upper Falls, Basin Falls, and Black Rock Falls. Lichen-covered trees and rocks form a lush backdrop, and wooden bridges add some fine old-fashioned whimsy. ”

This photograph is a different perspective of the same waterfall as in the previous photograph. By going lower, wider and moving a couple of steps I get a very different mood in the same waterfall. This one is almost monochromatic, almost sepia and has a kind of stillness about it compared to the dynamism in the other photograph. I also used my Singh-Ray Lighter Brighter neutral polarizing filter to get this image just right.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2.7 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I used one preset for this photograph apart from the lightroom basic tools panel Soft Highlights by Joop Snijder.

Here is the sample image and download link at Joop\’s blog. This lightroom preset is highly recommended – one of the staples in my workflow.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 1/4s at at f/4.0
Focal Length: 17mm
Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Ultra Wide Angle Zoom Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: April 17, 2010

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Uvas Canyon Waterfall – 1

Uvas Canyon Waterfall - 1
Uvas Canyon Waterfall – 1, by Suprada on Flickr.

Note: This photograph looks pretty nice as a print for your wall. You can buy your copy of this photograph from the Naked Frame: http://www.thenakedframe.com/collections/suprada-urval

Other Uvas Canyon waterfall photos:
Uvas Canyon Waterfall-2 – Coming soon

In the spring, a bay area resident need not look any farther than Uvas Canyon County Park for some very pretty waterfalls. This was the second time I had been to Uvas Canyon. On a Saturday, the intention was to wake up early and reach the park around sunrise. However, intentions and actions can differ at times…and I did not wake up early. I finally dragged myself outside the house at about 3.00 PM (sometimes one just wants to laze around and do nothing…)

Uvas Canyon County Park is near Morgan hill, located at the end of Croy Road in Uvas Canyon. From the Santa Clara County Parks website about Uvas canyon: \”This lushly wooded park of 1,133 acres, is nestled in upper Uvas Canyon on the eastern side of the Santa Cruz Mountains. This mountain park offers hiking, camping and picnicking opportunities throughout most of the year.” After an hour\’s drive, through very pretty Morgan hill surrounding I reached Uvas Canyon and started out on the \”Waterfall loop” trail. The best description I found of the Waterfall loop is from Weekendsherpa – \”The Waterfall Loop Trail is a short, sweet stroll that takes hikers past three signature attractions: Upper Falls, Basin Falls, and Black Rock Falls. Lichen-covered trees and rocks form a lush backdrop, and wooden bridges add some fine old-fashioned whimsy. \”

The \”waterfall” featured in this photo is not really a waterfall. Its a small embankment with an opening to let the water through. The light on this waterfall was so gorgeous with the sun shining in spots through foliage and the moss on the rocks were so pretty that I had to stop for this image. I used my Singh-Ray Lighter Brighter neutral polarizing filter to get just the image I wanted.

Post – Processing Notes:
I shot this image in RAW mode and used Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3.0 for my post-processing. After importing the photos into Lightroom and keywording them. I used one preset for this photograph apart from the lightroom basic tools panel Soft Highlights by Joop Snijder.

Here is the sample image and download link at Joop\’s blog. This lightroom preset is highly recommended – one of the staples in my workflow.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon EOS 50D 15.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Exposure: 0.3s at at f/4.0
Focal Length: 23mm
Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Ultra Wide Angle Zoom Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Date: April 17, 2010

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Dream or Nightmare?

Dream or Nightmare?
Dream or Nightmare?, by Suprada on Flickr.

Rock formations in Pebble Beach, near Pescadero CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1.5s at f/16
Focal Length: 17mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Ultra Wide Angle Zoom Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Date: November 1, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Motion – 6

Surf Motion - 6
Surf Motion – 6, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 6, Panther beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1.5s at f/16
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Surf Motion – 5

Surf Motion - 5
Surf Motion – 5, by Suprada on Flickr.

Surf Motion – 5, Panther beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 0.7s at f11.0
Focal Length: 15mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens for EOS Digital SLRs
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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Beer Bottle

Beer Bottle
Beer Bottle, by Suprada on Flickr.

Beer Bottle in Panther Beach, CA.

Technical Details:
Camera: Canon Rebel XT
Exposure: 1/6s at f8.0
Focal Length: 17mm
ISO: 100
WB: Daylight
Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Ultra Wide Angle Zoom Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Date: October 31, 2009
Filter: Singh-Ray Neutral LB Polarizer

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